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Arts & Entertainment

BOOK REVIEW: Vampire Knight by Matsuri Hino (Manga)

Matsuri Hino / VIZ Media

Matsuri Hino / VIZ Media

Monday, June 2, 2014 by Amanda Cummings

Yuki Cross has no memory of her past and someone doesn’t want her to remember. Soon her happy life will change and reveal the impossible. Yuki is an orphan, she was put in Kaien Cross’s care when she was very small. Kaien is a bit eccentric but means well. He has a secret of his own. Yuki also has a friend named Kaname Kuran who is a vampire. Yuki’s lost memory was of being attacked by a “level E” vampire so she was wary of Kaname at first. Slowly over time she stayed close to him.

Around the same time Kaien adopts a boy named Zero Kiryu who was bitten by a vampire. He has been fighting his vampire side but he has been going down to level E. Kaname Kuran is president of the night class and a pureblood. Zero and Yuki are the disciplinary committee who keep the academy safe. They are the division between the night and day class students, in other words the vampires and the humans. Yuki has to keep everyone in line, go to school and battle the vampire world. Little does she know behind her family`s deaths lies the secret connecting her to both worlds, and Kaname Kuran. In the end, which world will she choose and who will she choose to protect with her life?

This is not a regular book; it is a manga, a Japanese graphic novel that is read backwards. The author primarily showcases the main character as weak with her friends around her. As the story evolves she becomes stronger both mentally and physically. My favorite character was Kaname because he had the darkest personality. This series is still being written but has been finished up to volume 18.

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